Primitive Technology: smelting iron in a brick furnace – Boing Boing

John Plant of Primitive Technology is back making magic with naturally-occurring iron bacteria. In this video, we see him go through the entire process, from collecting and processing the iron bacteria, to creating the charcoal he’ll need, building the bricks and furnace, and finally, smelting the iron.
The yield of iron prills he gets is not as high as previous smelts (due to seasonal changes in the bacteria), so he tries experimenting with different furnace designs to see if it makes a difference in the yield. After three smelts and a lot of labor, he was only manages to make about 45 g of iron.
But hey, no one said that entering the Iron Age was a ever easy.
Thumbnail: Screen grab, Primitive Technology, John Plant
It’s fascinating to watch this process by which primitive technologist, John Plant (previously at Boing Boing), turns creek sand into usable iron prills. I love the ingenious sluice that he makes using one of the clay roofing tiles he made in a previous video. This looks like a lot of painstaking work for the modest… READ THE REST
Ever since John Plant has been back from a two year hiatus of his hugely popular Primitive Technology YouTube channel, viewers have been carping that he was basically remaking all of the same tech he’d made previously. Well, take this, naysayers. He made his first trebuchet. READ THE REST
In this Primitive Technology video, John Plant processes iron bacteria into prills and then cast them in a clay mold to create a crude but effective iron blade. It’s a long, painstaking process (e.g. 10 hours of sharpening just to get a usable edge!), but hey, iron age, baby! READ THE REST
We thank our sponsor for making this content possible; it is not written by the editorial staff nor does it necessarily reflect its views. Communication is the key to, well, almost everything. Understanding and being understood is so core to the experience of life that species will do almost anything to make sure they’re heard… READ THE REST
We thank our sponsor for making this content possible; it is not written by the editorial staff nor does it necessarily reflect its views. We know that technology can get overwhelming and is mostly very helpful, but none of your electronics can be good to you dead. Your phone is super useful daily, but it’s your… READ THE REST
We thank our sponsor for making this content possible; it is not written by the editorial staff nor does it necessarily reflect its views. A reliable chainsaw is necessary once you become a homeowner, but it often takes a lot of effort to lift and operate. The Pocket ChainSaw is a must for anyone who needs to cut and… READ THE REST
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Post expires at 12:51am on Sunday April 9th, 2023

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