Department of Psychology hosts summer camp to help kids develop coping, social skills – ASU News Now

The Clinical Psychology Center in the ASU Department of Psychology is again offering its online summer camp starting this June. ASU’s Skills Program Inspiring and Reinforcing Excellence, or Camp ASPIRE for short, will use fun activities, interactive games and evidence-based approaches to teach healthy coping, social and life skills that will position students for success now and later in life. 
“We’ve had such a good experience with the ASPIRE summer skills camp over the last two years, and we are excited to be offering it again,” said Matthew Meier, associate clinical professor and the director of clinical training.  CAMP ASPIRE starts this June. ASU’s Skills Program Inspiring and Reinforcing Excellence, or Camp ASPIRE for short, will use fun activities, interactive games The Clinical Psychology Center in the ASU Department of Psychology is again offering its online summer camp starting this June. ASU’s Skills Program Inspiring and Reinforcing Excellence, or Camp ASPIRE for short, will use fun activities, interactive games and evidence-based approaches to teach healthy coping, social and life skills that will position students for success now and later in life. Download Full Image
The program is delivered by clinical psychology doctoral students and is modeled on evidence-based prevention programs that have decades of research behind them. Camps are available for rising third through fifth graders and sixth through eighth graders. The younger group is based on the research done by Associate Professor Armando Pina’s Courage Lab, and the older group is based on Provost Nancy Gonzales’ Bridges Program. The Bridges program increases grades and confidence among teens while decreasing depressive and anxiety symptoms, discipline problems, school dropout and future alcohol use.
The Courage Lab is a research project that creates intervention programs for schools and community organizations to prevent and deal with anxiety and precursors to depression. The research has created offshoot programs, COMPASS for Courage and the HomeBound Initiative. COMPASS for Courage is a gamified social-emotional learning program to teach kids proven anxiety-management skills in schools, private practice or at home.
“This year, we are adapting the COMPASS for Courage intervention for the third- to fifth-grade age group. We have such exciting research being done in the department, and making this evidence-based program available to a broader audience is so important,” Meier said.  
“By taking a strength-based approach that is positive and valued, the research done by the Courage Lab better serves children, adolescents and caregivers,” Pina said. “One in five youth battle anxiety, and while anxiety is a normal emotion, some children and teens battle with high anxiety, worries and fears that don’t go away. This can often prevent them from achieving their goals, succeeding in school, making friends and facing their fears.”
Many students have struggled over the last two years to develop coping and social skills to help them deal with everyday stressors and build positive relationships. Camp ASPIRE provides a safe, game-based environment for children and adolescents to socialize, make new friends, set positive goals for the summer and beyond, while building on existing strengths. The camp does not provide psychotherapy and is not meant for treatment of mental disorders. Rather, it offers evidence-based prevention content that can help all students. 
Camp runs for two weeks, meeting online for two hours on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

  • June 6–17: 10 a.m.–noon OR 1–3 p.m. 
  • June 20–July 1: 10 a.m.–noon OR 1–3 p.m. 
  • July 11–22: 10 a.m.–noon OR 1–3 p.m.

The cost of the camp is $100 per student. A limited number of scholarships are available based on financial need. 
“Our primary goal is to help kids have fun while learning new skills, but we are also hoping to help out parents. As a working parent myself, I need some structured activities for my kids this summer. I think this camp will be a big help for me and my children,” Meier said.
Marketing and Communications Manager, Department of Psychology
480-727-5054
Since 2001, more than 2 million American children have had a parent deployed at least once. Military families endure many forms of stress, either directly or indirectly related to their time in the service, including multiple deployments, relocations, traumatic injury, loss or long-term stress and anxiety. It is reported that over 25% of military members and veterans experience acute stress, depr…
Since 2001, more than 2 million American children have had a parent deployed at least once. Military families endure many forms of stress, either directly or indirectly related to their time in the service, including multiple deployments, relocations, traumatic injury, loss or long-term stress and anxiety. It is reported that over 25% of military members and veterans experience acute stress, depression or even PTSD. 
One of the challenges for many service members is understanding that their personal traumas are not traumas that their children had to endure, and that the stress their children feel over seemingly trivial events is real. When their child is upset about not being invited to a school dance, it isn’t that the stressor isn’t causing pain to their child. While this is different from worrying about combat or personal safety, it can still be traumatic and important to their child.  Abigail Gewirtz Foundation Professor Abigail Gewirtz joined the Arizona State University Department of Psychology this year after an award-winning tenure at the University of Minnesota and brought with her a series of programs designed to help the parents and children of military families. Download Full Image
Additionally, their children and spouses have had to deal with different stressors, such as the uncertainty of if they will see their parents again, financial difficulties or having to move locations frequently and restart their lives.
Foundation Professor Abigail Gewirtz joined the Arizona State University Department of Psychology this year after an award-winning tenure at the University of Minnesota and brought with her a series of programs designed to help the parents and children of military families. 
“I have devoted my career as a professor first at the University of Minnesota, and now at Arizona State University, to developing and testing skills-based parenting programs that promote children’s resilience,” Gewirtz said. “Broadly speaking, I focus on parenting and how to help parents in particular who’ve been exposed to some kind of traumatic stress, whether that’s a parent who’s been deployed to war in Iraq or Afghanistan, or parents who have fled conflict in their home country, or parents and kids exposed to other kinds of violence.”
Gewirtz is the primary investigator of multiple projects, including the ADAPT program and Parenting in the Moment (PIM). The ADAPT program is an evidence-based parenting model giving parents tools to be their children’s best teachers, reduce stressors and improve family and individual wellness. 
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“One of the programs my team and I have been working on for the last more than 10 years is adaptive parenting tools or ADAPT. It was originally known as After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools because we originally designed it to serve military families in which a parent had been deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan,” Gewirtz said.
Gewirtz is also the head of the Center for Resilient Families in the ASU REACH Institute. The Center for Resilient Families aims to raise awareness of and increase access to parenting interventions and resources to promote resilience in traumatized children. She is also the author of “When the World Feels Like a Scary Place: Essential Conversations for Anxious Parents and Worried Children.”
A key feature of the ADAPT program is addressing how to talk with children about difficult and uncomfortable subjects. 
“Instead of ignoring the problem, or dealing with what we call big emotions, like those larger emotions that scare us, we coach families on how to understand what’s going on with ourselves first. This allows participants to understand and approach those often hard to talk about or hear about conversations from a parent’s perspective,” said Amy Majerle, research and implementation program manager of ADAPT. 
Majerle speaks from experience after serving in the Minnesota Air National Guard for 22 years and trying to maintain a family through deployment. She pursued graduate education to help similar families with that difficult process.
What is often lost in the reacclimation process for service members is interacting with their children after deployment. 
“Language in a high-stress environment, such as combat, is very different from what is ideal or helpful when communicating with your child,” Majerle said. “Your family may not respond well to your soldier tone at home. It’s hard because what makes you effective in one environment (the military) may not go over so well in a situation that needs a parent’s finesse. Our military parents have to learn how to switch hats, and that can be really difficult, especially when under stress.”
Learn how to get started with ADAPT as a family or as an organization.

Marketing and Communications Manager, Department of Psychology
480-727-5054
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